Uniforum Conference Papers

Registration is by the day so you are not obliged to select your papers in advance, but we reserve the right to withdraw or replace papers that are undersubscribed.

To ensure that the topics you want will be available, check them on the schedule (left pane). Hover or follow the links for information about events at particular times, or browse the paper descriptions below.

Once you have finished, you can return to the registration form.

It's ... Python

Thu 11 Jul 08:45 ~ 11:00
(Medium-tech)
Simon Britnell, Peace Software (NZ)

Abstract

The Python programming language is an excellent choice for both advanced system scripting and rapid application development. Assuming a beginner's knowledge of C, shell, Perl or Java programming, we introduce Python by comparing and contrasting these languages.

We take a whirl-wind tour of the powerful standard libraries, including the standard testing harnesses, and charge headlong into the powerful functional features like list comprehension and generators We conclude with an examination of mod_python and pygame: third-party libraries for web and game development.

Background

RPSL

Thu 11 Jul 08:45 ~ 09:45
(High-tech)
Andy Linton, Lionra

Abstract

As Internet backbone connectivity becomes more complex, it becomes more difficult to keep track of peering policies with providers and customers. By specifying routing details using RPSL in the public Internet Routing Registry (IRR) providers can use the information to check consistency and build router configurations.

Recent postings on the nznog mailing list illustrate that manual configuration of filter lists may leave something to be desired.

This paper will use a case study to examine the benefits of converting from manual configuration of BGP peering policy on routers to using tools such as RtConfig to extract policy information from IRR.

Background

Andy has recently been working on contract for APNIC on their pilot RPSL-based services that will eventually replace the current RIPE version 2 servers.

He has worked in New Zealand as Chief IP Engineer for Netlink and TelstraSaturn and IP Network Architect for Xtra and in Australia as a Network Engineer for connect.com.au and AARNet.

BoF: First time at Uniforum?

Thu 11 Jul 08:45 ~ 09:30
(Low-tech)
(TBA)

Abstract

A BoF or Birds of a Feather session is an informal group discussion on a topic of mutual interest; it may or may not be the same as advertised on the schedule!

However, for a first-up, we'll have a brief run-down on what you can expect to see and hear at the conference, and a chance to ask questions.

The session is free to members of the public; all other sessions require registration.

The business case for using Linux

Thu 11 Jul 09:30 ~ 10:15
(Low-tech)
Igor Portugal

Abstract

You are learning alot about Linux, and would like to use it, but there is still resistance amongst some corporate management. For some - it is fear of the unknown. Some are completely brainwashed by advertising from comercial OS vendors. Some have prejudices based on the past state of affairs in Linux market.

How do you move past all that, and get on with implementing what makes sence, and what you are comfortable with? Igor Portugal is the CTO of Asterisk, New Zealand's first specialised Linux IT company. In his job Igor often has to persuade different parties that Linux is the platform of choice for a particular solution. Igor has been successfully advocating Linux in New Zealand for over four years. In this presentation Igor will share some of his experiences, and offer some tips on how to move past the corporate resistance, and get on with the job you love.

Background

Multicasting - an Introduction to the Technology and Applications

Thu 11 Jul 10:00 ~ 11:00
(High-tech)
David Robb, Telecom NZ

Abstract

Assuming a basic knowledge of IP networking (ie, what IP addresses, routers, and routing protocols are, although detailed knowledge of them isn't needed), this presentation aims to introduce the concepts of multicast (as opposed to unicast or broadcast), a brief overview of the multicast routing protocols (IGMP, PIM, DVMRP etc) and the concept of reverse path filtering, and some discussion about applications of multicasting in the corporate/ISP/internet environment.

Basically it's a "this is why multicast is good, and why you should use it"

Hopefully this will lead to an increase of interest in the idea of an NZ Mbone.

Background

Install Linux on your PC

Thu 11 Jul 10:15 ~ 11:00
(Low-tech)
Sally Britnell

Abstract

Bring your PC or laptop along and get Linux installed, ready to use during the rest of the conference - and when you get home too!

Installation included with your conference registration.- no additional charge.

This will actually be available on several days; just turn up first thing and we'll get you sorted.

Background

Sally first came to a Uniforum convention in 2000, not long after she started using Linux -- and she's been hooked on both ever since.

Opening ceremony

Thu 11 Jul 11:15 ~ 11:45
(Plenary)

Abstract

Welcome one and all...

Tracking and Quantifying DDoS Attacks

Thu 11 Jul 11:45 ~ 12:45
(Plenary)
David Moore, CAIDA (USA)

Abstract

David's research interests are high speed network monitoring, denial-of-service attacks and infrastructure security, and Internet traffic characterization. His current research includes tracking and quantifying global DoS attacks using the backscatter analysis technique, developed with Geoff Voelker and Stefan Savage of UCSD. Most recently, David has been applying some of the same measurement techniques using large address spaces to monitor several of this summer's large worms: CodeRed v1 and v2, CodeRed-II, and Nimda.

David's work has also been featured with a cover photograph and story in Information Security Magazine (for work with Geoff Voelker and Stefan Savage), in Scientific American, and in numerous newspaper articles and television news programs. An animation of the spread of the CodeRed worm, developed by Jeff Brown and David Moore, appeared on CNN.

Background

David Moore is the Co-Director and a PI of CAIDA (the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis). His responsibilities nclude general management of a staff of 25 employees, including administrative and office staff, programmers, researchers, PhD's, and technical managers, as well as management and oversight of 3 NSF grants, a 2.4 million dollar DARPA grant, membership funds, and gift accounts.

David is also the lead technical manager at CAIDA. In this capacity, he has directed research efforts for passive management, including the CoralReef software suite, traffic workload characterization, Internet topology and performance, fragmented IP traffic, denial-of-service attack characterization, and DNS characterization. He also led the development of NetGeo, an automated tool that maps IP addresses, domain names, and Autonomous Systems (AS) numbers to geographic locations. He is a project collaborator for Walrus, a hyperbolic 3-D visualization tool for viewing large (on the order of one million nodes) directed graphs.

Introduction to Perl

Thu 11 Jul 13:45 ~ 16:00
(Medium-tech)
Scott Newton

Abstract

Perl has become very popular as a scripting language. In this session we will introduce Perl by showing the basic syntax and then looking at some of the more useful things you can do with it, including file handling and how to use modules. We will also have a brief look at Perl's reporting capabilities.

Background

Scott Newton works at Quanta Systems Ltd where he is technically the R&D Analyst. However, in reality, he does all sorts of odd jobs, from building firewalls, fixing network problems, etc and on through to 4GL development and support. He also writes scripts in perl, python and shell.

Distributed Denial of Service: The current state and counter measures

Thu 11 Jul 13:45 ~ 14:45
(High-tech)
Juergen Brendel, Esphion Ltd

Abstract

The presentation will provide a background about the DDoS threat, provide an overview of the evolution of the more popular tools used for this purpose and discuss future trends in DDoS. It then moves on to highlight some of the means by which DDoS attacks can be detected and how one might defend a site or network against such an attack.

Background

Juergen Brendel is CTO and VP of Engineering at Auckland- based Esphion Ltd., which specialises in tools for the defence against DDoS attacks. Before coming to Esphion, Mr. Brendel was software architect for Resonate, a Silicon Valley Internet traffic management software company, where he was responsible for the low-level networking components of Resonate's products. There he invented and implemented several patented networking technologies in the areas of resource-based load-balancing, RTT optimisation and others.

Before coming to Resonate, Mr. Brendel worked as software engineer at nCUBE Corp., developing software for massively parallel super computers. Other, shorter stints include time with Siemens in Canada as well as an Internet e-commerce company in Germany.

BoF

Thu 11 Jul 15:00 ~ 16:15
(Low-tech)

Multicast Development

Thu 11 Jul 15:00 ~ 16:00
(High-tech)
Greg Shepherd, Juniper Networks (USA)

Abstract

Multicast Deployment - This session will provide a perspective of multicast deployment overseas, including - the content and applications that it is supporting - how the 'chicken and the egg' situation (content vs capability) was overcome - common architectures. This is intended to help fuel discussion on multicast deployment in NZ.

Background

Strategies for Managing Denial of Service

Thu 11 Jul 16:15 ~ 17:15
(Plenary)
Ian Quinn, Juniper Networks

Abstract

Background

Ian Quinn has worked for various network operators, integrators and vendors over the past decade. He works as a Systems Engineer for Juniper networks where he has been involved in the rollout of customer networks over the past 1.5 years.

Linux IPtables (1)

Thu 11 Jul 17:15 ~ 18:45
(High-tech)
Adam Boileau

Abstract

Delving into the inner workings of Linux' IPtables

See also Linux IPtables (2)

Background

Wacking the Moles

Thu 11 Jul 17:15 ~ 18:15
(Medium-tech)
Simon Blake & Jonathan Martin

Abstract

aka "is Citylink a crap network? Discuss..."

aka "How we built a 5-nines network from stuff we bought from Dick Smith"

Simon Blake and Jonathan Martin of Citylink will speak about the past, present and future of Citylink. Discussion points could/will include hardware (physical construction, power issues), topology, administration, peering/APE/WIX, best practices for operators on Citylink, building routers from Linux PC's, and anything else that people ask us. Will probably contain some horror stories, there may be a little finger pointing and telco mocking, but we'll try to keep it seemly.

Background

Simon has been involved with Citylink more or less since its inception in 1996, as network administrator and lead mole wacker. Jonny has been with Citylink for about a year doing network admin, hardware integration, and VoIP development. Prior to joining Citylink he was with the broadband development group at Telecom NZ.

Discussion: Future of NZNOG

Thu 11 Jul 18:15 ~ 18:45
(Low-tech)
Donald Neal

Securing Linux

Fri 12 Jul 08:45 ~ 16:00
(Medium-tech)
Brendan Murray, Wolfhound Security

Abstract

Background

NLANR Active Measurement Project

Fri 12 Jul 08:45 ~ 09:45
(High-tech)
Tony McGregor, University of Waikato

Abstract

The NLANR AMP project is an active measurement project focused on the US Research and Education networks including Abilene and vBNS. The project has deployed 130 active measurement monitors around the network. There are also a small number of international monitors, including two in New Zealand. The project collects round trip time, loss and topology and will perform throughput tests on demand. Results are presented through web pages and graphical visualisations.

Background

Tony McGregor is a Senior lecturer in Computer Science at the University of Waikato. His interests include computer networks and operating systems internals. He is leader of the Universities WAND network measurement group and also of the NLANR AMP active measurement group, based at the San Diego Super Computer Centre in California USA. He is a frequent speaker at international conferences, including the keynote speech at the SAINT2002 measurement workshop.

BoF: First time at Uniforum?

Fri 12 Jul 08:45 ~ 09:30
(Low-tech)
(TBA)

Abstract

A BoF or Birds of a Feather session is an informal group discussion on a topic of mutual interest; it may or may not be the same as advertised on the schedule!

However, for a first-up, we'll have a brief run-down on what you can expect to see and hear at the conference, and a chance to ask questions.

The session is free to members of the public; all other sessions require registration.

Open Systems vs Open Source

Fri 12 Jul 09:30 ~ 10:15
(Low-tech)
Martin Kealey

Abstract

Has "open source" surpassed "open systems" as the wave of the future? Is Uniforum at risk of becoming extinct like the dinosaurs?

Multitenanted VoIP and the VoIP Market in New Zealand

Fri 12 Jul 10:00 ~ 11:00
(High-tech)
Roger De Salis, Cisco Systems

Abstract

Multitenanted VoIP, and the VoIP market in New Zealand.

VoIP is emerging very strongly, with the only-to-be-expected technical hurdles being experienced. From a financial perspective, all development on PABX equipment has stopped by all major PABX vendors, and all efforts by the major vendors are about implementing VoIP systems that are compatible with each other. The paper will focus strongly on local initiatives and efforts to help the transition to VoIP, and provide the service layer independent of the transport layer, which is required to allow a voice infrastructure over broadband to emerge.

Background

Roger De Salis has worked in the IT industry in NZ for far too long, and is currently an Account Manager with Cisco Systems, specialising in VoIP and Telephony applications using Internet technologies.

When not playing with voice, PC's and Cisco hardware, he is trying to figure out interesting ways to divert childrens student loan funds into AVGAS.

IPv6 for Dummies (and not so Dummies)

Fri 12 Jul 11:15 ~ 12:45
(High-tech)
Dean Pemberton, Juniper Networks (Aust.)

Abstract

There is a lot of buzz about IPv6 in the industry at the moment. In a recent survey of NZNOG membership it was rated in the top two topics that members wanted to learn about. This session will contain an in-depth discussion of the differences between IPv4 and IPv6. It will also explore the features new to IPv6 and how these may be used to allow easy migration from current IPv4 networks. It even solves the mystery of what happened to Ipv5.

Background

Dean currently works for Juniper Networks in Sydney. He has too many tasks to tie them down to just one job title, but Network Design/Support and Customer Training would be a start.

Before Juniper Networks he was employed by Lucent Technologies as Senior Network Engineer, and Ascend Communications prior to that.

Despite living in Australia, Dean maintains a high level of visibility in the New Zealand Internet. Posting far too much to the NZNOG list and working closely with New Zealand carriers and ISPs.

BoF

Fri 12 Jul 13:45 ~ 15:00
(Low-tech)

Residential Ethernet-on-Fibre

Fri 12 Jul 13:45 ~ 14:45
(High-tech)
Colin Goodwin, Ericsson NZ

Abstract

Every telecommunications engineer knows the BEST broadband access .. unquestionably it's fibre-to-the-home. However until recently it's been considered too costly for residential access, and deployment has been limited to a handful of small and expensive demonstrations.

Now things have changed and in Sweden (and a number of other countries) the first rollout of large-scale residential fibre-to-the-home is occurring, with many thousands of services now connected.

Ericsson has productised their offering, and has begun promoting the solution in New Zealand and Australia. The carefully tuned combination of Ethernet and Fibre elements makes it cost-attractive today, for the existing set of Internet, Pay-TV and telephony services, at normal prices.

Colin Goodwin has considerable experience in broadband access, having brought several ADSL and broadband satellite products to market. He is knowledgeable on the commercial factors that deliver a successful product as well as the technology factors.

Background

Providing Outsourced Network Security Solutions

Fri 12 Jul 15:00 ~ 16:00
(High-tech)
Arron Scott, Cisco Systems

Abstract

"Providing Outsourced Network Security Solutions" To increase revenue as an Internet Service Provider it is necessary to increase the value you add to customers beyond just delivering Internet access. One primary area of adding value is through the offering of Outsourced Network Security, which may include such features as Firewalling, Mail Filtering, DDoS prevention, and VPN's.

This paper intends to look at ways of defining, bundling, and deploying technology to deliver Security services that your marketing people can sell.

Background

BoF

Fri 12 Jul 15:00 ~ 16:00
(Low-tech)

Fighting the good fight

Fri 12 Jul 16:15 ~ 17:15
(Plenary)
Paul Vixie

Abstract

It is the bane of the Internet age: SPAM.

Once upon a time it was a brand-name of canned beef; nowadays it's a synonym for junk mail of the electronic variety, or just unwanted communications in general.

Paul Vixie cofounded MAPS which runs the original RBL - Realtime Blackhole List.

Background

Paul Vixie has been contributing to Internet protocols and UNIX systems as a protocol designer and software architect since 1980. Early in his career, he developed and introduced sends, proxynet, rtty, cron and other lesser-known tools. Today, Paul is considered the primary modern author and technical architect of BIND v8 the Berkeley Internet Name Domain Version 8, the open source reference implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS). He formed the Internet Software Consortium (ISC) in 1994, and now acts as Chairman of its Board of Directors. The ISC reflects Paul's commitment to developing and maintaining production quality open source reference implementations of core Internet protocols.

More recently, Paul cofounded MAPS LLC (Mail Abuse Prevention System), a California nonprofit company established in 1998 with the goal of hosting the RBL (Realtime Blackhole List) and stopping the Internet's email system from being abused by spammers.

Along with Frederick Avolio, Paul co-wrote "Sendmail: Theory and Practice" (Digital Press, 1995). He has authored or co-authored several RFCs, including a Best Current Practice document on "Classless IN-ADDR.ARPA Delegation" (BCP 20). He is also responsible for overseeing the operation of F.root-servers.net, one of the thirteen Internet root domain name servers.

More at ISC.

Wireless: 802.11a

Fri 12 Jul 17:15 ~ 18:15
(Plenary)
Matthew G. Brown, B & R Holdings

Abstract

An in-depth discussion about 802.11a & 5.8ghz PTMP networks, including Linux wireless routers. We don't sell equipment but we do service a lot. Would love to introduce some new concepts to the groups.

Background

DNS workshop

Sat 13 Jul 08:45 ~ 16:00
(High-tech)
Paul Vixie

Abstract

By the author of "BIND" himself!

Background

Paul Vixie has been contributing to Internet protocols and UNIX systems as a protocol designer and software architect since 1980. Early in his career, he developed and introduced sends, proxynet, rtty, cron and other lesser-known tools. Today, Paul is considered the primary modern author and technical architect of BIND v8 the Berkeley Internet Name Domain Version 8, the open source reference implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS). He formed the Internet Software Consortium (ISC) in 1994, and now acts as Chairman of its Board of Directors. The ISC reflects Paul's commitment to developing and maintaining production quality open source reference implementations of core Internet protocols.

More recently, Paul cofounded MAPS LLC (Mail Abuse Prevention System), a California nonprofit company established in 1998 with the goal of hosting the RBL (Realtime Blackhole List) and stopping the Internet's email system from being abused by spammers.

Along with Frederick Avolio, Paul co-wrote "Sendmail: Theory and Practice" (Digital Press, 1995). He has authored or co-authored several RFCs, including a Best Current Practice document on "Classless IN-ADDR.ARPA Delegation" (BCP 20). He is also responsible for overseeing the operation of F.root-servers.net, one of the thirteen Internet root domain name servers.

More at ISC.

BoF

Sat 13 Jul 08:45 ~ 09:45
(Medium-tech)

BoF: First time at Uniforum?

Sat 13 Jul 08:45 ~ 09:30
(Low-tech)
(TBA)

Abstract

A BoF or Birds of a Feather session is an informal group discussion on a topic of mutual interest; it may or may not be the same as advertised on the schedule!

However, for a first-up, we'll have a brief run-down on what you can expect to see and hear at the conference, and a chance to ask questions.

The session is free to members of the public; all other sessions require registration.

Linux at Home

Sat 13 Jul 09:30 ~ 10:15
(Low-tech)
Sally Britnell

Abstract

This session is aimed at people who are new to Linux and would like a broad overview of this OS with examples of its use in the home. Sally will provide a brief overview of the structure of Linux file system and introduce some common commands and applications in home use relating these to functions performed by similar commands and applications in Windows / MacOS. This session is designed to be an informal discussion and demonstration of a Linux system used in the home setting.

Background

BoF

Sat 13 Jul 10:00 ~ 11:00
(Medium-tech)

Install Linux on your PC

Sat 13 Jul 10:15 ~ 11:00
(Low-tech)
Sally Britnell

Abstract

Bring your PC or laptop along and get Linux installed, ready to use during the rest of the conference - and when you get home too!

Installation included with your conference registration.- no additional charge.

This will actually be available on several days; just turn up first thing and we'll get you sorted.

Background

Sally first came to a Uniforum convention in 2000, not long after she started using Linux -- and she's been hooked on both ever since.

Open Office tutorial

Sat 13 Jul 11:15 ~ 16:00
(Low-tech)
(TBA)

ICANN - Global Creep?

Sat 13 Jul 16:15 ~ 17:00
(Plenary)
Sue Leader

Abstract

Surviving ICANN: the way forward

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) was established in 1998 by the Department of Commerce in the USA. The MOU gives ICANN a mandate to manage a narrow range of technical functions necessary to ensure that the global Internet continues to function in a stable manner. InternetNZ, the manager of .nz, has played a significant role in the development of a representative body for the country code top level domain (ccTLD) managers to interact with ICANN in a fair and representative manner. It has also supported the development of global At Large (individuals) representation. After four years of hard work both communities of interest expected the ICANN Board to agree to formalise relationships at the March 2002 meeting. Instead the current CEO published a "Reform" paper, stating that ICANN isn't working and cannot work in its current form. ICANN has been regularly accused of 'mission creep' and some see the timing of the "Reform" paper as another move in this direction.

Background

Sue Leader is Executive Director of InternetNZ and has been active in international representation at ICANN since 1999.

Uniforum AGM

Sat 13 Jul 17:00 ~ 17:45
(Plenary)

Abstract

Your chance to participate in the future direction of the society

DJB Tools

Sun 14 Jul 08:45 ~ 10:15
(Medium-tech)
Simon Britnell, Peace Software (NZ)

Abstract

D.J.Bernstein (DJB) has written a variety of small, simple and - above all - secure network and system administration programs.

This presentation covers his managing daemons (daemontools), DNS (djbdns), email (qmail) and general unix client server programs (ucspi). We also examine DJB's published opinions on unix file system and show how these programs fit into a small office or home network.

Background

BoF: First time at Uniforum?

Sun 14 Jul 08:45 ~ 09:30
(Low-tech)
(TBA)

Abstract

A BoF or Birds of a Feather session is an informal group discussion on a topic of mutual interest; it may or may not be the same as advertised on the schedule!

However, for a first-up, we'll have a brief run-down on what you can expect to see and hear at the conference, and a chance to ask questions.

The session is free to members of the public; all other sessions require registration.

Automating the CRUD

Sun 14 Jul 11:15 ~ 12:45
(Medium-tech)
Simon Britnell

Abstract

Writing Create, Read Update and Delete functionality is a boring nessessity for any web application. Simon Britnell is building a system to construct these pages automatically from PostgreSQL database schema. We discuss the benefits, contrast against the three tier presentation to object to database approach and make a detailed examination of the mod_python implementation as it stands so far.

Background

Public Key Infrastructure and Digital Signatures tutorial.

Sun 14 Jul 13:45 ~ 16:00
(High-tech)
Peter Gutmann, Auckland University

Abstract

Everything you ever wanted to know about PKI and digital signatures but were forced to find out.

Background

Right here in New Zealand, Peter Gutmann is one of the world's foremost experts in cryptography theory, and its use in implementing authentication and privacy regimes.

Linux at Play

Sun 14 Jul 13:45 ~ 16:00
(Low-tech)
Simon Britnell, Peace Software (NZ)

Abstract

Computer games are a critical feature for operating system acceptance in the home. We tour a broad selection of open-source games available under Linux, take an overview of windows emulation using WINE and conclude with a survey of Linux game development tools and APIs available on the Linux platform.

Background

LDAP

Sun 14 Jul 13:45 ~ 14:45
(Medium-tech)
Brendan Murray, Otago University

Abstract

Background

Linux IPtables (2)

Sun 14 Jul 15:00 ~ 16:00
(Medium-tech)
Brendan Murray, Wolfhound Security

Abstract

See also Linux IPtables (1)

Background

Warning: events in the future
are closer than they appear

Sun 14 Jul 16:15 ~ 16:45
(Plenary)
Vik Olliver

Abstract

Technology observer Vik Olliver holds a mirror up to our past technological progress and gives us his projections for the future.

Closing ceremony

Sun 14 Jul 16:45 ~ 17:00
(Plenary)

Abstract

The party's over.